Europe is awash with so many beautiful countries, each offering different landscape and offerings. The Scandinavian country of Denmark is country that stands tall and proud and has over the years become a prime holiday and tourism destination.

Denmark is a country in Northern Europe. The southernmost of the Nordic countries, it is located southwest of Sweden and south of Norway, and bordered to the south by Germany. As a Scandinavian nation, Denmark shares strong cultural and historic ties with its overseas neighbors Sweden and Norway. The national language Danish is very closely related and mutually intelligible with Swedish and Norwegian.

Denmark has a temperate climate, characterised by mild winters, with mean temperatures in January of and cool summers with a mean temperature in August. Because of Denmark’s northern location, there are large seasonal variations in daylight. There are short days during the winter as well as long summer days.

Denmark’s many charms have become apparent to a global audience, particularly in recent years. Scandinavia’s “European” wing boasts glorious beaches, beautiful fairy-tale castles, lush forests, a temperate climate, friendly citizens, and a joie de vivre that’s infectious.

When visiting Copenhagen, many visitors make a beeline for the iconic Tivoli recreation space. Dating from 1843, Tivoli is the inspiration behind the world-famous Disney theme parks, and here, you’ll find a huge range of attractions including a roller coaster, roundabouts, puppet theaters, restaurants, cafés, gardens, food pavilions, and even a Moorish-styled concert hall. Known across the world, Tivoli has appeared in numerous movies and is a true symbol of the city. At night, firework displays illuminate the sky, and in winter, the gardens are adorned with lights for the Christmas season. During the summer, you can catch free rock concerts on Friday nights.

A ten-minute stroll from Tivoli Gardens leads to the National Museum (Nationalmuseet), which delves into Danish history and culture. The museum displays an impressive collection of Danish artifacts, including a 2,000-year-old sun chariot, Danish porcelain and silver, and Romanesque and Gothic church trimmings. Other collections highlight clothing from the 18th and 19th centuries as well as antique furniture.

On the tiny island of Slotsholmen in the center of Copenhagen, you’ll find the Danish seat of government. Boasting more than 800 years of history, Christiansborg is the power base of the kingdom of Denmark and now home to the Parliament, the Prime Minister’s Office, and the Supreme Court.

The star of countless images and postcards of the city, Nyhavn (New Harbor) is a great place to stroll or grab a slice of Copenhagen café culture. Located to the rear of Amalienborg Palace, this was once a disreputable stretch of dockland but has been given a new lease of life with its multi-colored houses, restaurants, and tall ships (some of which are museums) dotting the quayside. Nyhavn is now a particularly charming quarter and consequently a major draw for tourists and locals alike.

Round Tower is Well worth scaling for the excellent panoramic views, the Round Tower (Rundetårn) is 36 meters high and was built as an observatory in 1642. Here, you’ll find a small collection connected with the famous Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe, however the highlight for most is the viewing platform reached by a spiral ramp. A glass floor hovers 25 meters above the ground, and not only can you gaze out over the rooftops of Copenhagen city, but also peer down into the castle’s core.

Decades in the planning and often controversial, the Oresund Bridge has quickly become a Scandinavian icon. The bridge is around ten kilometers from Copenhagen, and you can either drive across or take the train. On the Danish side, it starts out as a tunnel so as not to interfere with flights to and from adjacent Copenhagen Airport.

The Kingdom of Denmark also encompasses two autonomous countries: the far-flung Farøe Islands and Greenland. Lying some 600 kilometers west of the Norwegian coast, the Farøe Islands (Sheep Islands) is an archipelago of 18 remote islands. Landscapes range from steep rocky coasts, meadows, and mist-cloaked hills to fjords that bite deep inland. The Gulf Stream moderates the temperatures on land and at sea and attracts a diversity of marine life, including seals, whales, and many species of fish.

This is a must see destination.